Alliance for Cancer Prevention

Brexit & Breast cancer: what does Brexit have to do with breast cancer?

Invitation to a Breast Cancer Prevention Month event – hosted by Helen Hayes MP. 26th October 11 am – 1 pm, Attlee Room, Portcullis House.

Speakers include: Helen Hayes MP, Zarin Hainsworth OBE, Chair NAWO, Helen Lynn, From Pink to Prevention, Hilda Palmer, Hazards Campaign, Nick Mole Policy Office Pesticide Action Network UK.

As we come to the end of Breast Cancer Prevention Month, we will be asking the question ‘what are the implications for breast cancer after Brexit?’ and exploring the answers. The chances are you’ll never have thought about breast cancer prevention in relation to Brexit. Yet they are linked. For example, our clean beaches and seas benefit from progressive EU legislation. Our health as citizens, consumers and workers most certainly has done and continues to benefit for EU legislation.

The European chemicals regulation (REACH) is a highly sophisticated, progressive pan-EU system to control toxic chemicals and, though not perfect, is the best in the world. At its heart is ‘the precautionary principle’ which means to take action to prevent harm, even if there is uncertainty. For the UK to be de-coupled from REACH would have a devastating impact on many aspects of consumer, workplace and environmental health and our economic wellbeing.

Please download the Brexit and breast cancer invite.

To reserve a place please RSVP to: Helen Lynn helen@frompinktoprevention.org Deborah Burton: 07779203455

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European Parliament rejects unworkable and unlawful chemical regulation for endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs).

European Parliament rejects unworkable and unlawful chemical regulation for endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs).
4/10/17

Today the European Parliament rejected the unworkable and controversial European Commission proposal of identification criteria for endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs). The Alliance for Cancer Prevention is very heartened that MEPs [i] have rejected this proposal as it would have failed in its aim to protect human health or our environment. As EDCs have long been linked with cancer, the proposal would not have contributed to cancer prevention which would have been a severe disappointment given their potential for recognition of EDCs as risk factors for cancer. EDCs can be found in wide range of products which people are exposed to each and every day, such as plastics, cosmetics, toys, building materials and cleaning products, through the work they do or the lives they lead.

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Flawed and ineffectual Endocrine disrupting chemical criteria agreed by European Commission.

After years of delay and quibbling by the European Commission on how far it would go to protect EU citizens from Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs) , the end results suggests not far enough! Up until now EDCs, which are linked to cancer, reproductive and developmental disorders, infertility and allergies, have had no effective regulation despite the fact that they can be found in a variety of products we live and work with on a daily basis. Scientists and independent scientific institutes have submitted evidence and written to the EC to express their concern about the ‘unfit for purpose’ EDC criteria. But despite scientific concerns and a petition signed by almost half a million people the Commission has now produced and agreed flawed criteria to assess EDCs which will fail to prevent unnecessary exposure for citizens and workers.
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